The Training of 1992 Olympic 5000m Champion Dieter Baumann

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Yobes Ondieki told me that you have got to be able to run, at any time of the week, any time of the year, a fast l0-miler.” Isabella Baumann

Dieter Baumann 1992 Olympic 5000m gold for Germany

Sources

  • British Milers Club Journal. Volume 3, Issue 3. 1997.

Looking back over the past 30 years, there have been only a handful of Europeans, Americans, Canadians, Australian’s or New Zealanders who have been able to compete with the Africans on a consistent basis.  German 1992 Olympic 5000m champion, Dieter Baumann, is one of those men.  Baumann was coached by his wife, Isabella, a qualified exercise physiologist.

Runner’s Tribe took a look back at Baumann’s training.

  • DOB: 9 February 1965. Blaustein, West Germany
  • Nationality: German.
  • Retired: 2003.

Personal Bests

  • 1500: 3:33.51
  • Mile: 3:51.12
  • 3000m: 7:30.50
  • 5000m: 12:54.70
  • 10,000m: 27:21.53

Highlights

  • Olympic 5000m Gold, Barcelona 1992.
  • Olympic 5000m Silver, Seoul 1988.
  • European 5000m Gold, Helsinki, 1994.

Isabella’s Coaching Principals

  • Every athlete has to be treated as an individual and therefore their training varied and athletes within the same group would often do very different sessions.
  • An average of 90 miles per week on a consistent basis is an accurate gauge of what is required to be world-class.
  • The norm was two hard sessions and two long runs per week.   Isabella did not believe in three hard sessions per week as she did not think an athlete could adequately recover.
  • Adequate sleep is absolutely vital.
  • A coach needs flexibility and athletes need to listen to their bodies and communicate with their coaches.  If an athlete is tired and needs more recovery, then the program should be adjusted to take this into account.
  • Isabella was a big believer of altitude training, especially for winter lower intensity training.

The year’s training was split between phases. Phase 1 being ‘Winter Training’. Phase 2 being ‘Spring Altitude Training’. Phase 3 being ‘Pre-Competition Training’. And phase 4 being ‘Competition Training’.

Phase 1. Winter Training

An example of typical training during this phase is outlined below:

  • Monday
    • A.M.: 15km at an easy pace.
    • P.M.: 8km run then a strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
  • Tuesday
    • A.M.: 17km at a fast pace.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run.
  • Wednesday
    • A.M.: Long run, 25km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.
    • P.M.: Strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
  • Thursday
    • A.M.: 12km easy run.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run.
  • Friday
    • A.M.: 15km easy run. Then a strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
    • P.M.: Water run, easy active recovery,
  • Saturday
    • A.M.: Hard 22km hilly fartlek.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Sunday
    • Long run, 25km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.

Approximate mileage: 161km per week.

Phase 2. Spring Altitude Training

An example of typical training during this phase is outlined below:

  • Monday
    • A.M.: 15km at an easy pace.
    • P.M.: 8km run then a strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
  • Tuesday
    • A.M.: Repetitions. 1km, 2km, 3km, 2km, 1km.  Approximately 60-90 seconds recovery.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run and sometimes some swimming.
  • Wednesday
    • A.M.: Long run, 20km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.
    • P.M.: Strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
  • Thursday
    • A.M.: 15km easy run.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run.
  • Friday
    • A.M.: Hill repetitions.  12 x 250m hills with jog back recovery.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Saturday
    • A.M.: Steady state 15km run. Hard.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run.
  • Sunday
    • Long run, 25km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.

Approximate mileage: 155km per week.

Phase 3. Pre-Competition Training

An example of typical training during this phase is outlined below:

  • Monday
    • A.M.: 12km at an easy pace.
    • P.M.: 8km run then a strength workout. The strength workout involved the athlete’s own body weight and lasted for about an hour.
  • Tuesday
    • A.M.: Repetitions.  4 x (1000m, 400m). Done in 2:42-2:50, and 55-56 seconds.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Wednesday
    • A.M.: Long run, 18-20km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.
  • Thursday
    • A.M.: 12km easy run.
    • P.M.: 8km easy run.
  • Friday
    • A.M.: Track. 14 x 500m with every 3rd rep very fast.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Saturday
    • A.M.: 12km run.
    • P.M.: 8km run.
  • Sunday
    • Long run, 22km. Not worrying about the speed.  Done in a hilly environment for maximal strength building.

Approximate mileage: 145km per week.

Phase 4. Competition Training

An example of typical training during this phase is outlined below:

  • Monday
    • A.M.: Repetitions.  4 x 1000m. Then 4 x 300m.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Tuesday
    • A.M.: 10km run.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Wednesday
    • A.M.: 15km run.
  • Thursday
    • A.M.: 8km run.
    • P.M.: 6km run.
  • Friday
    • A.M.: Warm-up routine.
    • P.M.: Race or time trial 3000m.
  • Saturday
    • A.M.: 6km easy run.
    • P.M.: 6km easy run.
  • Sunday
    • A.M.: Warm-up routine.
    • P.M.: Race 5000m.

Approximate mileage: 100km per week.

Note: On 19 October 1999 Baumann tested positive for nandrolone and received a two-year suspension, thus missing the 2000 Summer Olympics. The exact circumstances of this episode remain unclear. Baumann was voluntarily tested after the initial results by an independent institute. Extremely high levels of nandrolone continued to be found in the tests and the results of the tests fluctuated dramatically depending on which time of day Baumann was tested. After several weeks of voluntary tests, Baumann claimed that the results varied with the time of day because the nandrolone was in his toothpaste. The German Athletics Federation (DLV) reluctantly believed Baumann that someone had manipulated his toothpaste and allowed him to start at the German championships where Baumann qualified for the Olympic Games in Sydney. However, the IAAF did not agree with that verdict and imposed a ban. (Source Wikipedia).

Men’s 5000m Final Barcelona Olympics 1992

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