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Training of famous runners - Members Only

Training of famous runners

The story of the Ingebrigtsen brothers and their father is movie worthy stuff. Over 1500m, the slowest of the three brothers has a PB of 3:31.46. Over 5000m, the slowest brother has a 13:15 to his name.  Runner’s Tribe got the chance to grab some inside peaks at the training of the family, and this feature article outlines some of the key sessions the three brothers regularly complete leading into important races.
Clayton’s marathon career brought wins in some of the world’s most prestigious marathons but no Olympic or Commonwealth medals. Despite the absence of precious metals, however, this was no ordinary career. Of his 22 marathons, Clayton won 14. Included in those wins was Fukuoka in 1967, one of the occasions on which Derek Clayton very definitely smashed the marathon. He ran the classic distance on this classic course in 2:09:36.4, becoming the first man to break 2:12, 2:11 and 2:10, all in the one race. Less than 18 months later, Clayton ran even faster – 2:08:33.6 in Antwerp. This performance stood as a world best until Rob de Castella ran 2:08:18 at Fukuoka more than 12 years later. Runner’s Tribe, in the book Australian Marathon Stars, interviewed Clayton and detail. Below are some nuggets of gold.
In early 2003 Mona was interviewed by Neil Macdonald. The below training schedule and training/running tips are courtesy of Neil Macdonald.  Neil MacDonald managed the Geelong Region Cross Country team from 2000-2007.
At the INEOS 159 challenge, Runner’s Tribe was lucky enough to catch up with a few members of Eliud Kipchoge’s training squad, to discuss the training of Kipchoge during the build-up to his second crack at running a sub 2-hour marathon.  It is important to note that Kipchoge’s training has not changed in many years. Therefore, the below schedule is how Kipchoge prepares for all his marathon races. An outline is provided below:
Boston Marathon, April 18, 2011 - a day to remember in marathon running history. The winner, Geoffrey Mutai, ran 57 seconds under the then-current world record, stopping the clock at 2:03.02.  Mutai had a few factors working in his favour that day. Firstly, there was a strong tailwind of...
During the early nineties, Queenslander Simon Doyle was a serious player at a global level over 1500m. Doyle that year won three Grand Prix races and finished 4th at the Commonwealth Games in Auckland. In 1991, Doyle finished 12th at the World Athletics Championships final in Tokyo. It was...
In February 2004, Lee Troop was a man on a mission. His goals for 2004 were to have a crack at the Australian Marathon Record (2:07.51 held by Robert de Castella) at the London Marathon and to finish in the top 10 at the Athen’s Olympic Marathon. To achieve these goals, Lee changed his training focus from the more traditional Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday ‘hard / quality sessions’ to the following, more ‘marathon specific’ training program.
The Training of Craig ‘Buster’ Mottram “I didn’t think I would see an Australian do what he is doing. To have an Australian under 13 minutes for 5km is unbelievable.”  -Steve Moneghetti Free Sources: – With thanks for help from Neil MacDonald from Geelong Cross Country Steve Moneghetti once blamed Craig Mottram for...
© 2019 Runner’s Tribe, all rights reserved. “My bottom end speed is usually pretty good, so like 200’s, 300’s, 400’s - they come around pretty quick - but that 800, 1000 kind of rep, that’s my weakness and what I tend to work on a lot.” -Matthew Centrowitz ‘Centro’ doesn’t really...
“Long, slow distance running creates long, slow runners. If speed is the name of the game, then never get too far away from it.” - Peter Coe Seb Coe is the only man to win back to back Olympic 1500m titles (1980 and 1984). At the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics...