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RT Journals

Catch all the latest from all our track and field stars as they discuss everything from their personal training sessions to updates on their athletic journey.

Written by Brett Davies for Runner's Tribe June 10th this year marks the 40th anniversary of one of the greatest middle-distance performances of all time. Britain's Sebastian Coe's world 800m record of 1.41.73. At Florence (Firenze) Italy on a calm summer evening, the legendary distance running icon produced what was...
There are many ways to train for distance running. Whether you’re an athlete coming from a shorter distance background, or an athlete that was born with a natural aerobic ability, there are many ways to train the body to reach its full potential. I don’t believe there is one...
The 2004 world cross country (WXC) in Brussels was certainly the highlight of my career. It was my 4th world cross country (my first time in the 8km race) and without a doubt, going into it, I was in my best shape of my career to date. I had always doubted my ability in these big races, i.e. Olympics, world track and field champs, world indoors etc, but for some reason, when I ran in the WXC, I always knew I belonged at the front. In the back of my mind in WXC races, I knew I could beat everyone (even the Africans) if I had a good day. I had no fear and always raced aggressively, putting myself in medal winning positions even at my first one in 2001 (where I placed 6th). I was incredibly consistent at the WXC year in, year out. I was never able to achieve this consistency on the track or road.
I have always loved running, whether that be racing on the track, running the road for a marathon, chasing a football growing up, or running after my twin brother. Running has given me so much and I am not sure where I would be today without it. It is...
It is hard to believe it is already a year ago that the world turned itself upside down, and life, and training, for the dedicated exercisers, as we knew it changed around the globe. One key to success and some form of consistency here, was adaptability. Luckily for me being a triathlete, I am already used to the art of cross training and the benefits that can be gained in one area to maintain fitness in another. The cross over can be great for everyone. That said I chose to make running the priority during this period of uncertainty, given its great bang for buck on fitness, consistency, proximity and the pleasure and positive mental boost it gives me over other training sessions. Plus, it was running season, and with a couple of local road races around, it gave me something different to work towards, and to mix things up with the runners in a local triathlete vs runners showdown :)
Weight training has been a key component of my training program for the majority of my career. I can’t say that I enjoy the gym, as I much prefer the running components to my training, however I believe it has been a key ingredient in my ability to generate...
What’s up guys, I’m Jake Wightman and for those who don’t know me, I’m a British 1500m runner (and occasional 800m dabbler). I wanted to start sharing some stuff on here, and to begin with I’m going to give you a look at my 3 weeks of training in the build-up to running a 3:29 1500m in Monaco last Summer. This was a big PB for me and put me number 2 on the British all-time list for the event and helped me achieve a career goal of going under the 3:30 barrier. Hopefully the training data will speak for itself, but I’ll give you a bit of context around some of the stuff.
My name is Sophie, I'm 29 years old and live in Cambridge, New Zealand. I am part of the NZ High Performance Triathlon Team targeting Olympic Qualification for Tokyo 2021. I started the sport of triathlon as a 16 year old in 2008, and have loved being in the High Performance team from then up until now. A big highlight for me was competing at the 2019 Tokyo Test Event. My training is a little different than many other triathletes. My coach and I are not big on volume, but prefer specificity and a "quality over quantity" approach. I train around 20hrs a week, including 4-5 runs, 4 rides, 4 swims, 2 gyms and 1 yoga session a week. My favourite sessions are speed sessions where I might do 300m reps as fast as I can run. I love the feeling of running fast and I find the most satisfaction from these sessions. I occasionally enjoy long steady runs but prefer to do these with company so we can have a chat and a laugh! Nothing beats a bit of banter with friends. My husband George and my friend Ryan Sissons paced me to a PB 5km last year of 16:37 which I found a lot more fun with them beside me!
By Nick Roger Clarke THURSDAY MARCH 19, 2020 – 10km recovery run. I approach a floodlit MCG which is fully aglow, revealing such a spectacle of electric brilliance that it sucks all the light from the night’s stars, from the CBD skyline, and from the Punt Road traffic lights, before blasting...
In our sport, recovery is very important as we put so much pressure on our body and we demand so much from it day after day. To be able to get what we want from our body, it’s important to care for ourselves, especially after doing a hard race or session that can leave the body feeling stiff and sore. Below are 5 recovery tips, as well as some convenient alternatives to have you feeling more ready for your next race or session.